Matters of life and dating plot generator

Story Generator

Especially given what people most want out of dating apps: variety, of “Hang The DJ,” but does offer plot details not seen in the episode trailer. So it's surprising it took four seasons for Black Mirror creator Charlie (Why spend several years of your life in a relationship you know will eventually end?). A site of generators to randomly produce concepts, characters, and 9) Solo: A Star Wars Story – sequel/prequel to an original movie. Release Date: While the Arms Race continued in , other matters overshadowed the world of to kill himself to destroy the Moonraker rocket in the novel, one life for millions. Automatically generate a story plot for film or paperback using key words of your choice. Select from a Plot Generator. Inspiration Dating Profile Generator.

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You'll also find links to more creative writing prompts at the bottom of the page. Any of these ideas can be used either humorously or dramatically Do you like this page?

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Story ideas - three elements Choose a set of three elements and write a story that contains all three of them! A stolen ring, fear of spiders, and a sinister stranger. A taxi, an old enemy, and Valentine's Day. Identical twins, a party invitation, and a locked closet.

A broken wristwatch, peppermints, and a hug that goes too far. Aerobics, a secret diary, and something unpleasant under the bed.

matters of life and dating plot generator

An ex-boyfriend, a pair of binoculars, and a good-luck charm. An annoying boss, a bikini, and a fake illness. The first day of school, a love note, and a recipe with a significant mistake. A horoscope, makeup, and a missing tooth. A campfire, a scream, and a small lie that gets bigger and bigger.

More short story ideas Challenge: Are you up to it? Why not write a book of short stories? Choose seven or eight short story ideas to get started. A babysitter is snooping around her employer's house and finds a disturbing photograph At a Chinese restaurant, your character opens his fortune cookie and reads the following message: Say nothing to anyone. You must leave the city immediately and never return. Your character's boss invites her and her husband to dinner.

Your character wants to make a good impression, but her husband has a tendency to drink too much and say exactly what's on his mind It's your character's first day at a new school. He or she wants to get a fresh start, develop a new identity.

But in his or her homeroom, your character encounters a kid he or she knows from summer camp Your character has to tell his parents that he's getting a divorce.

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He knows his parents will take his wife's side, and he is right At the airport, a stranger offers your character money to carry a mysterious package onto the plane. The stranger assures your character that it's nothing illegal and points out that it has already been through the security check. Your character has serious doubts, but needs the money, and therefore agrees Your character suspects her husband is having an affair and decides to spy on him. What she discovers is not what she was expecting A man elbows your character in a crowd.

After he is gone, she discovers her cell phone is too. She calls her own number, and the man answers.

  • Forty-Four Short Story Ideas
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She explains that the cell phone has personal information on it and asks the man to send it back to her. Instead of going to the police, your character decides to take matters into her own hands After your character loses his job, he is home during the day. That's how he discovers that his teenage son has a small marijuana plantation behind the garage. Your character confronts his son, who, instead of acting repentant, explains to your character exactly how much money he is making from the marijuana and tries to persuade your character to join in the business At a garage sale, your character buys an antique urn which she thinks will look nice decorating her bookcase.

But when she gets home, she realizes there are someone's ashes in it Learn to make your story a page-turner with our online course Irresistible Fiction. Even more short story ideas Your character starts receiving flowers and anonymous gifts.

She doesn't know who is sending them. Her husband is suspicious, and the gifts begin to get stranger A missionary visits your character's house and attempts to convert her to his religion. Your character is trying to get rid of him just as storm warning sirens go off.

Your character feels she can't send the missionary out into the storm, so she lets him come down into her basement with her. This is going to be a long storm Your character is caught shoplifting.

The shop owner says that she won't call the police in exchange for a personal favor Your character is visiting his parents over a holiday. He is returning some books to the library for his mother and is startled to notice that the librarian looks exactly like him, only about thirty years older. He immediately begins to suspect that his mother had an affair at one time and the librarian is his real father Your character picks up a hitch-hiker on her way home from work. The hitch-hiker tries to persuade your character to leave everything and drive her across the country Your character has to sell the house where she grew up.

A potential buyer comes to look at it and begins to talk about all of the changes she would make to the place. This upsets your character, who decides she wants to find a buyer who will leave everything the way it has always been A bat gets in the house. Your character's husband becomes hysterical, frightened that it might be rabid. In his panic, he ends up shutting the bat in a room with your character while he calls an exterminator from a safe place in the house.

One factor must be that remembering is always re-remembering. Like a game of Chinese whispers, any small error is likely to be propagated along the chain of remembering. The sensory impressions that I took from the event are likely to be stored quite accurately. When we look at how memories are constructed by the brain, the unreliability of memory makes perfect sense. In storyboarding an autobiographical memory, the brain combines fragments of sensory memory with a more abstract knowledge about events, and reassembles them according to the demands of the present.

The force of correspondence tries to keep memory true to what actually happened, while the force of coherence ensures that the emerging story fits in with the needs of the self, which often involves portraying the ego in the best possible light.

One of the most interesting writers on memory, Virginia Woolf, shows this process in action. In her autobiographical essay, A Sketch of the Past, she tells us that one of her earliest memories is of the pattern of flowers on her mother's dress, seen close-up as she rested on her lap during a train journey to St Ives.

She initially links the memory to the outward journey to Cornwall, noting that it is convenient to do so because it points to what was actually her earliest memory: But Woolf also acknowledges an inconvenient fact. The quality of the light in the carriage suggests that it is evening, making it more likely that the event happened on the journey back from St Ives to London. How many more of our memories are a story to suit the self? There can be no doubt that our current emotions and beliefs shape the memories that we create.

It is hard to remember the political beliefs of our pasts, for example, when so much has changed in the world and in ourselves. How many of us can accurately recall the euphoria at Tony Blair's election in ?

When our present-day emotions change, so do our memories. Few of us will have reliable memories from before three or four years of age, and recollections from before that time need to be treated with scepticism. When you think about the special cognitive tricks involved in autobiographical memory, it's perhaps no surprise that it takes a while for children to start doing it right. Many factors seem to be critical in children's emergence from childhood amnesia, including language and narrative abilities.

When we are able to encode our experience in words, it becomes much easier to put it together into a memory.

The story of the self

Intriguingly, though, the boundary of childhood amnesia shifts as you get closer to it. As a couple of recent studies have shown, if you ask children about what they remember from infancy, they remember quite a bit further back than they are likely to do as adults.

There are implications to the unreliability of childhood memories. A recent report commissioned by the British Psychological Society warned professionals working in the legal system not to accept early memories dating from before the age of three without corroborating evidence. One particular difficulty with early memories is their susceptibility to contamination by visual images, such as photographs and video.

I'm sure that several of my childhood memories are actually memories of seeing myself in photos.

matters of life and dating plot generator

When we look back into the past, we are always doing so through a prism of intervening selves. That makes it all the more important for psychologists studying memory to look for confirming evidence when asking people to recall their pasts. And yet these untrustworthy memories are among the most cherished we have.

Memories of childhood are often made out to have a particular kind of authenticity; we think they must be pure because we were cognitively so simple back then. We don't associate the slipperiness of memory with the guilelessness of youth.

When you read descriptions of people's very early memories, you see that they often function as myths of creation. Your first memory is special because it represents the point when you started being who you are.

In Woolf's case, that moment in her bed in the St Ives nursery was the moment she became a conscious being. For one thing, I don't think we should stop valuing it. Memory can lead us astray, but then it is a machine with many moving parts, and consequently many things that can go awry.

Perhaps even that is the wrong way of looking at it. The great pioneer of memory research, Daniel Schacter, has argued that, even when it is failing, memory is doing exactly the thing it is supposed to do. And that purpose is as much about looking into the future as it is about looking into the past. There is only a limited evolutionary advantage in being able to reminisce about what happened to you, but there is a huge payoff in being able to use that information to work out what is going to happen next.

Similar neural systems seem to underpin past-related and future-related thinking. Memory is endlessly creative, and at one level it functions just as imagination does.

That's how I think we should value memory: It's important not to push the analogy with storytelling too far, but it's a valuable one.